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Community Police in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq received specialized training courses to improve impact, effectiveness, and gender sensitivity

Erbil, Iraq – 28 September 2016 - Under the auspices of the Ministry of Interior of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, and the generous support of the Government of Japan, the Human Rights Office of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) and the United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) launched two specialized training courses with the theme: “Improving the Impact, Effectiveness, and Gender Sensitivity of the Community Police Directorate in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq.”


Community Police officers are often the first responders and best placed to provide immediate protection of human rights of citizens and residents, providing security and a safe environment by preventing crimes and defusing social conflicts. This early response function carries with it a responsibility to respect the rights and fundamental freedoms of all Iraqis.
The specialized courses addressed 30 Police Officers from 25 September to 28 September 2016 in Erbil, and will address 25 Police Officers from 2 to 5 October 2016, in Sulaymaniyah. The courses aim at reinforcing the understanding of law and order, human rights and fundamental freedoms, gender sensitivity, and respect for the principles of legality, necessity, non-discrimination, proportionality, and humanity. Topics will include the interaction between the community and law enforcement personnel through policing strategies and practices based on human rights standards, with a particular focus on gender sensitivity and awareness.
Mr. Nazar Abdelgadir Salih, Director of Geneva Institute for Human Rights and Colonel Ziad kayedbay, Director of Human Rights and Training Department at the General Directorate of Police in Lebanon together with UNAMI Human Rights staff members provided the sessions with the assistance of the Police Academy of the Ministry of Interior of Kurdistan Region of Iraq.
To serve the community efficiently, the Community Police must have human rights standards firmly incorporated into rules governing its operations. Officers, in their daily work, should respect and protect human dignity, and maintain and uphold the human rights of all persons.
Under this project, funded by Japan, UNOPS will refurbish, and construct 30 community police centres and provide equipment, including at least eleven 4x4 vehicles, 30 motorcycles, 81 radios, and many pieces of furniture.

Additional Info

  • Agency: UNAMI